This blog is the communication channel between the Odysci Team and you – our users! We will use this space to let you know about what is happening and new features we develop. We value your opinion – send us your feedback via comments below or email to feedback@odysci.com.

Posts categorized “Academic Search”

New Search Feature “publisher:” to Search on Papers by a Given Publisher

We have implemented and launched a new search feature to allow users to find papers based on the Publisher (e.g., ACM, Springer).
To search on a publisher you would use the following search string:

publisher:publisher_name

For example, the search string:

publisher:ACM

finds articles or books published by the ACM.

You can combine the publisher search with any other advanced search tag. For example:

The search string

publisher:ACM type:journal

finds journal papers published by the ACM.

The search string

publisher:”Morgan Kaufmann” title:”machine learning”

finds articles or books published by Morgan Kaufmann with “machine learning” on the title.

Please note that this feature is experimental. The publishers of many papers may not be available, thus the results may be incomplete. We are working on improving it. But we think it is a useful feature as is and we wanted to make it available immediately. We hope you can find it useful too.

If you have any suggestions, just shoot us a comment.

Categories: Academic Search, Search Feature.

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Add the Odysci Search Box to Your Site

Now you can easily add the Odysci Search Box to your site and display the results directly under your web pages.
Whether your site is a:

  • personal page
  • conference page
  • journal page
  • library page
  • technical blog page
  • and anything else really

If your visitors are technical folks, they may enjoy having an easy way to search for technical papers right while visiting your site. Please see the code below.

Dedicated Search Box

If you are a conference or journal, we can generate a dedicated search box for your site which can search only through your conference or journal papers from previous years, issues, etc. What better way to offer your conference/journal papers to your audience without any extra work?

If you are a Conference organizer or Journal Editor and would like to add a dedicated search box to your site, please send an email to info@odysci.com.
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Categories: Academic Search, Search Feature, User Customizations.

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New Search Features: “venue@” and “@{affiliation or place}”

We have expanded our advanced search features to include two more ways of refining your search.

The first is the “venue@” search tag. Using this tag you can specify the location of a conference that you want to search for. For example, suppose you want to find papers on conferences that were held in Seattle. You would use the following search string:

venue@Seattle

Refining further, suppose you want to find papers published in the KDD Conference when it took place in Seattle. You would use the following search string:

venue:KDD  venue@Seattle

This may come handy when you know you saw a good presentation at a conference you attended some time ago, but cannot remember the author or title. You can augment this search with topic keywords or author names.

The second feature is the @{affiliation or location} search tag. This is an experimental shorthand notation for searching for a paper that matches the affiliation of its authors, or the location of the conference. For example, the search string:

author:”Sangiovanni-Vincentelli”  @”New Orleans”

finds articles published by Alberto Sangiovanni-Vincentelli in conferences that took place in New Orleans. This is handy when you remember the speaker and the place, but cannot quite remember the article. This search will help you find that paper.

Please note that these features are experimental. The affiliations of authors and the locations of conferences are not yet available in all cases, thus the results may be incomplete. We are working on improving it. But we think it is a useful feature as is and we wanted to make it available immediately. We hope you can find it useful too.

If you have any suggestions, just shoot us a comment.

Categories: Academic Search, Search Feature.

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New Search Feature ‘author@’ = Search on Author Affiliation

We have just launched an exciting new search feature: the ability to find papers based on the authors’ affiliations when they published the paper.

Suppose, for example, that you want to find papers authored by Leslie Lamport while he was at SRI International. You would use the following search string:

author:Lamport author@SRI

or

author:Lamport author@”Microsoft Research”

for papers authored by Lamport while at Microsoft Research.

Alternatively, suppose you want to find papers about “ranking algorithms” by Google authors. You would simply type in the search box:

author@Google  ”ranking algorithms”

You can combine this feature with any other. For example, if you want to find papers by at least one author from Google and one author from Stanford, you would use the following search string:

author@Google author@Stanford

Please note that this feature is experimental. The affiliations of authors in many papers are not yet available, thus the results may be incomplete. We are working on improving it. But we think it is a useful feature as is and we wanted to make it available immediately. We hope you can find it useful too.

If you have any suggestions, just shoot us a comment.

Categories: Academic Search, Search Feature.

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Academic Search – A Primer

Odysci (www.odysci.com) is a web portal for academic search and technical collaboration in the computer science, electrical engineering and related areas. Academic search is a specialized type of vertical search that returns published scholarly works, ranked according to various criteria.

Before the actual search and rank can be done, there are dozens of tasks that need to be accomplished, many of which involve significant algorithmic and computing challenges in the areas of machine learning, similarity and clustering, graph analysis, information retrieval and databases. This article briefly introduces the reader to these tasks and informally navigates through the steps of developing a service like odysci.com.

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Categories: Academic Search. Tags: .

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Search Habits of Researchers

Introduction

Prior to the launch of the Odysci Academic Search site, we commissioned a marketing firm to conduct a poll among researchers to find out where, how and what they searched for. This report describes some interesting results we collected.

We believe these results can be useful to the scientific community and help improve academic search engines. Working together with researchers we can tune the search engine to better serve the needs of the researchers in finding  the most relevant information for their work in the least amount of time.  During the development of the Odysci Academic Search Engine we paid close attention to the opinions expressed in this survey. We continue to work with researchers to improve everything on the site, including navigation mechanisms, ranking algorithms, peer collaboration and additional content. If you want to participate in this quest, send us your views, tell us what you need and how you use an academic search engine. You can send your views by posting comments on the blog (blog.odysci.com) or by email to feedback@odysci.com.

First a word on the methodology used. This was an informal poll with no pretense of being statistically relevant. In the span of 3 months in mid 2010, we sent email invitations to about 20,000 researchers (i.e., people who had published at least one paper in conferences and journals in the computer science and eletrical engineering fields). The invitations contained a link to a polling site with the survey. We did not identify the company, we simply stated that the survey was being conducted by a marketing firm on behalf of an academic search site.

We collected 400 responses, i.e., people who clicked on the link and completed the survey. This comes to 2% of respondents, which (as the marketing firm told us) is pretty good! The geographic distribution of the respondents is shown below.

We asked several questions related to how researchers use academic search sites, what they look for, and what they think of the results they get. Most questions were multi-valued and multiple choice (e.g., the respondent could say that he/she uses site-A 80% and site-B 20% of the time). The values plotted in the following sections were, in most cases, the Expected value of the possible choices, that is, the weighted average of all possible values that each choice can take, normalized with respect to the highest value.

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Categories: Academic Search, Search Habits. Tags: , .

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